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The moon can be frozen remnants of ancient magma ocean of the Earth



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The moon can be frozen remnants of ancient magma ocean of the Earth

A new study suggests that the Moon was formed after a giant protoplanet crashed into the ground, which was then covered in an ocean of magma. Resulting in a surge of magma disk around the planet that eventually united in the month, according to a study.

Credit: Shutterstock

There is a problem with the month: In fact, no one knows how it is formed, and the most popular theory – known as the giant impact hypothesis – does not seem to coincide with modern observations of the chemical composition of the Moon.

In a new study published April 29 in the journal Nature Geoscience, a team of researchers from Japan and the United States attempts to resolve the paradox of the moon, adding an ocean of magma to the mix.

A new study begins with the standard version of the giant impact hypothesis, which goes something like this: One day, some 4.5 billion years ago when the solar system was still full of children of the planets, a renegade rock about the size of Mars took a wrong turn near Venus and crashed head-on even forming of the Earth. The destroyed remnants of the outer asteroid, along with some pieces of broken material, broken away earth, joined in orbit around our planet and eventually become circular, slaves month, we know and love, the theory goes. [10 Interesting Places in the Solar System We’d Like to Visit]

Computer & # 39; a computer simulation of an ancient impact suggest that, if it was really as the moon came to be, most of the material, which is a month would have come from an asteroid that crashed into the Earth. However, recent studies of lunar rocks tell a different story. More and more, the researchers found that the chemical composition of the Earth and Moon are almost identical. How, then, could be a month consists mainly of Earth and basically non-Earth at the same time? Something has to give.

The authors of the new study attempts to solve this paradox, setting a time of great impact about 50 million years after the formation of the sun (relative to earlier estimates usually end window) when the young Earth was probably covered with sea of ​​magma up to 930 miles (1,500 km) of depth. In a series of computer & # 39; computer simulations, the researchers smashed rocky protoplanet this magma flooded the Earth, and then watched as the molten sea splashed into space in a giant "arm" magma.

This image shows a simulation of a team giant crusher (blue) Endeavor in magma covered the proto-Earth (red), about 4.5 billion years ago. As huge amounts of lava spilled out into space, they formed a disk around Earth that eventually merged into the moon.

This image shows a simulation of a team giant crusher (blue) Endeavor in magma covered the proto-Earth (red), about 4.5 billion years ago. As huge amounts of lava spilled out into space, they formed a disk around Earth that eventually merged into the moon.

Credit: Hosono et al / Nature Geoscience

Effect magma reached significantly higher temperatures than planetoids stony material, causing a surge of magma expand & # 39; screen as it appeared in the space. First, the researchers wrote, lapping followed magma fragments of proto-planets orbit around the Earth, but soon caught up with them. While most of the protoplanetary drummer eventually fell into the hot ocean of the Earth, a huge cloud of molten material remained in orbit, and in the end of the & # 39; united in the Moon. Such modeling leads to the Moon with a much higher percentage of the Earth, the resulting material than previous studies have shown.

"In our model, about 80% a month is made from materials of the proto-Earth," said study co-author Shun to-Ichiro Karato, Geophysics at Yale University, in a statement. "In most of the previous models, about 80% a month is made of the hammer. It's a big difference. "

According to the authors, the hypothesis of the magma-ocean shows that the Earth, as the chemical composition of the Moon can be compatible with the giant impact theory. This is not a complete answer to the question, how a month, but it is not to unify the vast theory with real observations of a little more gently.

originally published live science.

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