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SpaceX static tests for the Falcons of Fire Nuclei Heavy Megarocket



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SpaceX Falcon Heavy megarocket test kernel missiles for the upcoming mission, which will send 23 satellites into space in June. (Photo: SpaceX / Twitter)

SpaceX Falcon Heavy is preparing to send back into space in the near future, and this time, he launched 23 satellites into orbit.

After his first commercial mission, the company has tested the static fire from megarocket core of his & # 39 Texas facility April 26 Space.com reported. SpaceX has also published a photograph of fiery trial on TwitterReaffirming the first step for the next big launch Falcon gunner.

"Falcon Heavy center rod booster completed static test fire missiles at our plant development in McGregor, Texas before its next mission → http://spacex.com/stp-2» the company wrote in a Twitter status.

The upcoming mission will be the first flight of Falcon Heavy to the Ministry of Defense of the United States dubbed the Space Test Program-2 (STP-2). According to Space Flight Now Falcon Heavy rocket is scheduled to take off from the historic Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on June 22 The purpose of this mission & # 39 is almost send 24 satellites into space.

«STP-2 mission would be the most difficult to launch SpaceX stories with four separate engine burns the upper stage, three separate orbits deployment final passivation propulsive maneuvers, and the total duration of the mission more than six hours," wrote SpaceX herein mission. "In addition, the US Air Force is planning to re-use the side boosters from Arabsat-6A Falcon Heavy launch recovered after returning to start landing site, making it the first re Falcon Heavy ever flown."

23 Satellites mission SpaceX also have different goals: Green Propellant Infusion NASA mission will fly a new type of fuel that can increase the efficiency and safety of space traffic, while the Prox-1, which was developed by students at the Georgia Institute of Technology, will experience small satellites to see if they can perform operations close encounter.

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