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Scientists say brain injury people can uine religious



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Scientists over the years leg in the human brain is "such a struggle," or the specified area of ​​the brain responsible for religious beliefs. Now, however, argue that the defects of the brain make people more extreme, if their religious beliefs in this matter.


Source: PsyPost Telegram

Illustration / Photography: Depositphotos / Yakobchuk

Illustration / Photography: Depositphotos / Yakobchuk

People who have suffered in traumatic brain injury in the prefrontal cortex are less open to new ideas. For them, there is a greater likelihood of becoming fundamentalists, according to a study conducted at the Veterans of the war in B & # 39; etname.

Scientists from Northeastern University in Illinois found that people who have brain damage less cognitively flexible and less able to change their point of view.

Prefrontal cortex to the & # 39 is an area of ​​the brain associated with a variety of functions, including planning and the perception that it is on before connecting with religious and mystical experiences. Defects in the region show that such people are less able to critics to evaluate their religious beliefs in relation to other people.

"People's beliefs, in this case religious, is what sets us apart from other species," says study co-author Ðordano Grafman for website PsyPost.

"We must understand that religious beliefs are different from the moral, legal, political and economic."

Despite this study that helps us understand the relationship between brain and religion, there are other factors that affect how people religious, since they & # 39 are the characteristics of their own personality and socially supportive environment.

"While religious and other certificates can be prouavaju selectively and independently of other cognitive processes and drutvenih, and depending on the interaction with other functions Modan WE ment area of ​​research over the next decade," said Dr. Grafman.

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