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Human ancestors were "grounded," a new analysis shows



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Human ancestors were "grounded" a new analysis shows

Evolutionary tree depicting relationships between living apes and modern humans Ardite. Each branch in the tree represents a plan view and their intersections are their common ancestor. These points represent hypothetical evolutionary changes associated with the development of terrestrial living ancestors adaptations generally African apes and humans, as well as the evolution of upright walking, which is confirmed by analysis. This shows that people bipedalism evolved from ancestral forms, like the living African apes. Credit: Thomas Prang

African apes adapted to life on the ground, and the output that shows the man evolved from an ancestor is not limited to a tree or other high places of residence. The analysis adds a new chapter in the evolution, shed additional light on what preceded human bipedalism.


African apes adapted to life on the ground, and the output that shows the man evolved from an ancestor is not limited to a tree or other high places of residence. The analysis adds a new chapter in the evolution, shed additional light on what preceded human bipedalism.

"Our unique form of human locomotion evolved from an ancestor that was moving in similar ways to the living African-chimpanzee apes, bonobos and gorillas," explains Thomas Prang, a doctoral student in the department of New York University anthropology and author of the study, which is a & # 39 is in the magazine eLife"In other words, the common ancestor we share with chimpanzees and bonobos was an African monkey, which is likely to adjust to life on earth in one form or another, and frequency."

The way people go striding bipedalism, with the & # 39; is unique among all living mammals attribute through countless changes over time.

"The human body was much modified by evolutionary processes over the past few million years, so what happened to make us better walker and runners," says Prang.

Most of these changes occur in the human foot, which has evolved to be the engine body with the thumb, and incapable of grasping ape spring, energy-saving arch that extends from the front to the rear.

These features raise long been studied, but ultimately did not answer the question: what kind of ancestor made the human foot develop?

in eLife work, Prang, a researcher at the Center of New York University for the study of human origins, focusing on fossil Ardipithecus ramidus ( «Ardi"), the 4.4 million-year-old human ancestor from Ethiopia, more than a million years older than the well -known fossil "Lucy". The bones of Ardi were first published in 2009 and was the subject of discussion ever since.

In their study, Prang set the relative proportions of several lengths of bones in the skeleton legs primate to assess the relationship between the movement of the species (locomotion) and skeletal characteristics (morphology). In addition, relying on the fossil Ardi, he used statistical methods to restore or to assess what the common ancestor of humans and chimpanzees, may have looked like.

There he discovered that the African apes show a clear signal to adapt to land lives. The results also indicate that Ardi's foot morphology and the estimated human-chimpanzee last common ancestor most similar to these African monkeys.

"So people are descended from an ancestor who was adjusting to life on earth, perhaps not unlike those who are in African monkeys," Prang concludes. "These data suggest that the man bipedalism was derived from a form of locomotion similar to the life of African apes, which contrasts with the original interpretation of these fossils."

The original interpretation of the fossil foot Hardy, published in 2009, suggested that his leg was more ape than chimpanzee- or gorilla-like. The meaning of this interpretation with the & # 39 is that many of the features shared by the living great apes (chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas and orangutans) to their legs and elsewhere, have evolved independently in each line, in another time and place.

"People with a & # 39 are part of the natural world and our musculoskeletal system adaptive walking upright, it can not be understood outside the context of a natural evolution," Prang watching. "Large-scale evolutionary change does not seem to occur spontaneously. Instead, they have roots in the deeper story, revealed in the study of fossils.

"The study of fossil Ardi shows that the evolution of our own land live adaptive bipedalism preceded by a four-legged land-adaptation of living in a common ancestor that we share with African apes."


New data shed light on the origin of bipedalism in human ancestors


Additional Information:
Cody Thomas Prang. African ape-like foot Ardipithecus ramidus and its implications for the emergence of bipedal locomotion, eLife (2019). DOI: 10,7554 / eLife.44433

Information about the journal:
eLife

provided
New York University

citation:
Human ancestors had been "grounded", a new analysis shows (2019, April 30)
received April 30, 2019
by https://phys.org/news/2019-04-human-ancestors-grounded-analysis.html

This document & # 39 is on & # 39; subject to copyright. Except in the case of fair use for the purpose of private study or research, NO
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